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Booklet Contents

- North Aisle and Hugesson Chapel
- Floor Slabs and Covering Vaults
- Roper Chapel
- Chancel Tablets
- Nave Tablets
- South Aisle

- Additional Research (2006) on North Chapel Families

Hatchments

- Illustrated, rules governing them and a Flow diagram

Additional Documents and References

- Society Project to record Lynsted Parish Church Graveyard

- The five bells

- Church organ (subscription), font and Communion Table

- War Damage and £1,000 appeal (1940)

- Hatchments (mostly 18th century)

- Elizabeth Selby, MBE, assessment of the church

- Guide book (PDF download, revised 2012)

Memorials and Tablets inside Lynsted Church of Saints Peter and Paul

Thanks to David Wood, church warden, for permission to reproduce his research from 1996. First published as a pamphlet for visitors to Lynsted Church in 2001 - in the hope that this would enhance enjoyment of the building and its long history. Several images of memorials have been included and added to.

Subject headings and associated inormationYou can 'jump' to chapters in this article or
browse other church-related material using the side menu.

1) North Aisle and Hugesson Chapel

April 2006: Additional Research was added by David Wood about the family connections with the North Chapel, together with more details on the Hugesson pedigree. You may also find interesting the article from 1932 about the Roper Memorials in the Douth Chapel, written by Aymer Vallance.

Moving into the North Aisle, the only brass here is hung on the wall, and is dedicated to a previous vicar of Lynsted [1]:

‘To the Glory of God and in loving memory of the Rev JOHN HAMILTON,
Vicar of this Parish for 52 years, who entered into rest 25th May 1891, aged 84 years.
This window was erected by his widow. ‘

John Hamilton was responsible for much work in the church, and his large grave can be seen in the graveyard just out side the North door. The stained glass window to which this plaque refers was another casualty of the bomb, but he was also responsible for the finely detailed carved reredos and the stone screen to the north of the sanctuary.

Unfortunately, very little of the original glass remains as it was destroyed by enemy action during the last war when a bomb dropped on the roof and exploded, causing considerable damage to all the glass and fabric.

The tablets and memorials are listed working from the north door, and the names in heavy type are those to whom the dedication is given. The original spelling has been left in many cases, and is not the result of typographical error!

The precise location of each monument or tablet may be found with reference to the floor plan of the chapel to which the numbers refer.

On the north wall, above the door is a white marble memorial [2], dedicated as follows:-

In the vault in this Chancell (sic)
Is deposited the Body of MARTHA HUGESSEN,
Wife of WILLIAM HUGESSEN Esq. of Provender,
Who died the 15th day of March 1733
A.tat 53
She was the eldest daughter of PETER COTT Esq., of
Stanmer in the County of Sussex.

In the same vault is Deposited the Body of
DOROTHY HUGESSEN, second wife of the above
WILLIAM HUGESSEN Esq.. She was the youngest
Daughter of FRANCIS TUSSEN Esq. of Hackney,
In the County of Middlesex. She died May
Y 23d 1749 A.tat 48.
In the same vault is Deposited the Body of the
Aboved named WILLIAM HUGESSEN Esq. of
Provender. He was the eldest son of WILLIAM
HUGESSEN of the same Place. He died the 18th of Janry 1753 in the 72nd of His Age.

Sepulchri
Mitte Supervacuous Honores
(Put this above the empty honours of the Tomb)

Catherine Drury Moving eastwards on the north wall is the memorial [3] to Dame Catharine Drurye, with the following interesting inscriptions:

Dame CATHARINE late wife of Sir DRUE DRURYE, gentleman usher of ye privy chamber of our soveraign ladye Queen Elizabeth. Daughter and sole Heire of William FINCHE of ye parishe Esquire. She deceased ye 13 Daye of September 1601 in ye 45 yeere of Hir age’.

The memorial depicts both Sir Drue and Dame Catharine , with one son behind Sir Drue, and three daughters behind his wife.

And beneath:-

‘If virtuous rage of oldiscene,
If worthye matche commende,
If modeste life, If children sweete,
If meeke and Godlye ende,
Then she whoe lyeth enterred heere,
Was sure and happye wighe
Whoe with these golden graces all,
And many more was dighe,
Cease then to mourne for hir you frends
Whose vertues rare were founde
Hir soule in blisse doth raigne in Heaven,
Though bodye rott in grounde’.

It is of considerable interest to find that at the top of this memorial there are two coats of arms, one relating to the Drury family above which is the second which bears in part the boars of the Hugessen family. There is no evidence to connect these two families, and further research has to be carried out in order to identify the origin of that portion of the arms which bears what appears to be fleur de lis below which is a black cross on a gold background. Looking to the right, the next memorial [4] is one to Josias Hugessen, but unlike every other Hugessen memorial, this one bears no coat of arms, and there is a gap at the top of the tablet where one would expect the arms to be. It is a matter of speculation that the explosion during World War II which took out the glass of the church windows also caused damage to the memorial, subsequent repair to which resulted in the incorrect positioning of this coat of arms. This supposition, however, was found to be incorrect, since a record made in the eighteenth century by the Revd. Hopkins Fox, a previous incumbent, stated that this tablet was in the same place as it is today. Moreover, a photo taken of the devastation caused during the war shows that the pediment on the adjacent memorial survived the bomb blast intact, but was broken subsequently. Recently, as the result of a visit to the church by a researcher, he was able to identify the coat of arms impaled by that of the Hugessen is one belonging Brockman. It is now certain beyond doubt that this coat of arms belongs to William Hugessen, son of James, who married Margery Brockman, the record of which appears on the large memorial against the east wall of the chapel. A mystery still remains though regarding the reason for its position on the Drury memorial.

Sir Drue Drurye was one of the Commissioners of Elizabeth I who was responsible for the conveyance to Fotheringhay Castle of the warrant for the execution of Mary Queen of Scots. It is understood that he was also a witness to the signature on this warrant.

Beneath this is a tablet [5]

‘Sacred to the memory of THOMAS KNATCHBULL-HUGESSEN fourth son of the late Rt. Hon. Sir EDWARD KNATCHBULL - HUGESSEN Bart. and FANNY CATHERINE his second wife, M.P. for the Faversham division of Kent, 1885 -1895, Born Dec 1st 1835, died May 15th 1922.’

Next to this memorial is one [6], with black marble pillars supporting a pelmet from which curtains in white marble hang, bearing the inscription:-

‘Christ is to me both in life and death advantage’

M.S.

‘Here under lieth the body of JOSIAS HUGESSEN, Gentleman, the fourth son of JAMES HUGESSEN Esq. and of JANE HUGESSEN his wife, who married MARY daughter of Mr. Ambrosia ROSE, of yea Parish of Cheslet (Chislet) in this County, by whom he had one onely daughter named JANE, Obit, 20th November No. Din. 1639 Aetat Svae 22.’

with the following verse:-

‘Now dry your teares (tears), and know they never dy,
That to the world can leave a memory
Like this young man: who, from his childhood grew
Up towards heaven; to God in service true;
To Superiors still in fitt obedience
To Parents duty
To all Men Good will
And, at his End, gave Others light, to see
The ready way to blest Aeternitie.’

Beneath this is another plaque [7] bearing the family crest above a coat of arms with two small eagle heads above a chevron and a larger eagle head below, separated by a centre design incorporating boars and crosses, is a number of squares resembling dominoes on the right. Above all is a lion on a coronet. The following is written at the head of the memorial:-

Fanny and Edward Knatchbull‘He is not dead, but sleepeth’
‘Here lies enterred, close to the remains of his beloved wife ANABELLA CHRISTIANA, the body of the Rt. Hon(oura)ble. Sir EDWARD KNATCHBULL Bart., who departed this life May 24th 1849 aged 67 years. As a Magistrate, as a Member of the House of Commons, as a Minister of the Crown, he laboured assiduously in the discharge of his public duties; and in every relation of private life his loss must be deeply felt by his sorrowing family and friends. Sir Edward was twice married; by his first wife, ANABELLA CHRISTIANA, daughter of Sir JOHN HONEYWOOD Bart. of Evington, he had five sons and one daughter, of whom the eldest, NORTON JOSEPH, is the present Baronet. By his second wife, FANNY CATHERINE, daughter of EDWARD KNIGHT Esq. of Godmersham Park, he had five sons and four daughters. The survivors of whom have, by their father’s desire, taken the name of Hugessen in addition to that of Knatchbull. Sir EDWARD’s mother was MARY, daughter and co-heiress of WILLIAM WESTERN HUGESSON Esq., of PROVENDER . Her sister DOROTHEA, was the wife of the Rt. Hon. Sir JOSEPH BANKS Bart.. In the same vault repose the remains of Dame FANNY CATH. KNATCHBULL*, widow of the above by whom this monument was erected, and the others repaired and restored in 1850. She died December 24th 1882, aged 89 years.’

(*Fanny was niece to Jane Austen)

John HugessenIn the north east corner of the chapel is a large memorial, at the head of which is a helm and a coat of arms incorporating boars and a red star. The memorial depicts a couple kneeling in an attitude of prayer at a small table or priedieu, beneath which is an infant (indicating a posthumous birth i.e. the child was born after his father’s death) and above which is written [8]:-

‘I am sure that my Redeemer liveth, and that to my love and comfort.’
‘Here under lyeth buried the body of JOHN HUGESSEN, Merchant, 2nd sonne of
JAMES HUGESSEN Esq.. He married LEA, ye daughter of Mr. Peter FORTRIE
Merchant, and departed this life on the 12th January 1634, being about the 22nd year of
his age, and left his wife with child of a sonne whose name is JOHN ‘

 

On the right side is this verse:-

‘Return’d to earth againe
Here may you find
The corps that living
Lodg’d an heavenly mind.
As from childhood unto man he grew
Duty to God and man grew in him too.
With knowledge he respected each degree
And with his knowledge mixed humilitie.
When he was come to years at which he hurled
Mens wardships off, he then cast off ye world
To fly to his inheritance above,
Upon the wings of fayth and Godly love.
Soe did he live and die in perfect trust
To rise againe and live among the just.’

It is possible that the John born posthumously was not the father of the four children, three of whom were William, Edward and Alethea, mentioned elsewhere, but no mention is made of this.

James Hugesson Left SideJames Hugesson Right SideThe largest of the memorials in the chapel stands resplendent at the east wall [9]. This shows both husband and wife together with their seven children. Each child carries some article in their hand, possibly indicative of the occupation which they followed. The dedication is as follows:-

‘To the memory of JAMES HUGESSEN Esq., ‘Merchant Adventurer’. He deceased the 2nd. October anno 1646, and to the memory of JANE his wife by whom he had issue, WILLIAM, JOHN, JAMES, JOSIAS, PEETER, WALTER and MARY. WILLIAM had two wives viz. ELIZABETH daughter to Sir John HIPISLYE, Knight, the second was MARGERY, daughter to Sir William BROCKMAN, Knight, and MARY, the daughter, was married to Robert EVERINGE Esq., heyre of Everinge. ‘

The verse to the right of the memorial reads:-

‘Infancy youth and Age are from ye wombe
Man’s short but dangerous passage to his tomb.
Here landed (the proceed of what we vent’red)
In Nature’s custom-house this dust is ent’red.
Christ’s all our gaine by whom, in death we live
And carry hence, but only which we give.;
Almes-deeds are surest bill at sight, (the rest
On Heaven’s Exchange are subject to protest)
This uncorrupted Manna of the just
is lasting; store exempt from worms and dust’.

Beneath on a separate black marble tablet is inscribed in capitals:-

‘AND AS WEE HAVE BORN THE IMAGE
OF THE EARTHLY, SO SHALL WE(E) BEAR(E)
THE IMAGE OF THE HEAVENLY’ 1 COR. 15 VER. 49.

On the south wall of the Hugessen chapel, there is a memorial [11] in black marble with the family arms above, to

Rodolphi WekerlinRODOLPHI WEKERLIN’ at the head of this memorial is the inscription :-

‘Thou shalt show me ye path of life,
In Thy presence is ye fulness of joy,
And at Thy right hand there is pleasure for evermore’

Below is the inscription in Latin, which translates as:-

‘The Tomb Of the son and Heir of RUDOLPH VECALIN Knight, to whom, after various Misfortunes and very many critical times when the Christian World had been so Greatly extended, and not in a just way, Fate finally gave this allotted resting Place And finally, in this tomb, gave a more lasting Rest. He lived for 50 years and 100 Days. You would consider this too little, but a lot if you were to consider His Good qualities. His wife ANN, the distinguished daughter of WILLIAM HUGESSEN Esq., who survived her husband’s death was distraught when her husband was snatched from her embrace, and to ensure that his memory would endure for all time, as proof of her love, set up this inscription so as to associate His friends in grief and so that others could mourn with her. He died 22nd December 1667.
H.S.E.
SIR GIDEON DELAUNE, a man possessed of Piety, Probity and a Pleasing and good-natured sense of duty changed location in September 1709 Aged 73.’

This meaning of ‘changed location ‘ in this last paragraph seems ambiguous, and could be interpreted as meaning that Sir Gideon died at this time. The DeLaune family, once owners of Sharsted Court which now belongs to the Wade family, have several tombs in Doddington Church.

Beneath hangs a white marble memorial [12] with coat of arms above, to ANN DELAUNE, with the following charming inscription:-

‘In the vault beneath lies the body of ANN DELAUNE, widow , daughter of SIR WILLIAM HUGESSEN of Provender, Knight, first married to RODOLPH WEKERLIN, then to GIDEON DELAUNE Esq. To both a most loving and dutiful wife. She was exemplary pious towards God, Charitable to the poor, just and useful and agreeable to all, and being full of days and good works, she departed this life full of peace and hope, November 13th Ano Dom 1719 aged 84 years in memory of which this monument is humbly dedicated by her niece and executrix, ANN, ye wife of Alderman AUGHTON of Canterbury.’
N.B. In the dedications above, William Hugessen is referred to first as Esquire, and then as Knight. His Knighthood must have been conferred after the death of his daughter Ann’s first husband in 1667.

The last of the hanging memorials [13] is placed at the south west corner of the chapel behind the organ, and is difficult to see, but the dedication is as follows:-

‘Here lies the body of WILLIAM WESTERN HUGESSEN Esquire, who was happy in the form born both of his body and mind. He was naturally modest, gentle and polite, which a liberal education had duly improved. His early sense of religion was by a diligent application to rational studies settled into a vital piety. In the year 1757, he married TOMASINE, second daughter of Sir JOHN HONEYWOOD Baronet, by whom he had three daughters, DOROTHEA, MARY and SARAH. He departed this life 19th June 1764 aged 29. His widow, very sensible of her loss and his merit has dedicated this monument out of pious regard to his memory. She died 17th January 1774 aged 39 years, and lies here enterred.’

Beneath is a plaque [14] which reads:-

‘In the vault of her husband’s maternal ancestors are deposited the remains of ANNABELLA CHRISTIANA, wife of EDWARD KNATCHBULL Esquire, and third daughter of Sir JOHN HONEYWOOD Baronet, of Evington in this county. She departed this life at Provender suddenly before she had completed her 29th year, on Monday April 4th 1814, and left issue six children, MARY-DOROTHEA, NORTON-JOSEPH, EDWARD, CHARLES-HENRY, WYNDHAM, and JOHN.
An afflicted husband inscribes this tablet to record his loss and to recall the virtues of a good and affectionate mother, to the remembrance of those of her children who may visit this sacred spot.

2) Floor Slabs Covering Vaults

In the floor of the chapel are several stones covering vaults, the largest near the north door is of slate and carries two brasses. The stone itself is in a very poor state of repair and offers a considerable trip hazard. The brasses have suffered some damage and both brasses and stone require urgent repair, as do the tiles in the surrounding area, having sunk slightly. The top brass bears the family crest and is positioned on the diagonal, and the lower brass to this stone carries the following inscription:-

A

‘Here lieth the body of JAMES HUGESSEN, late of Dover, Marchant (merchant) who deceased the 24th March 1637, being of the age of 80 years and upward.’

B

Moving west, there are two smaller stones, the left of which reads:-

‘Here under lieth, waiting for the coming of her blessed Saviour, the body of ALETHEA HUGESSEN, second daughter of JOHN HUGESSEN and CHRISTIAN his wife, who sweetly rendered up her soul to God that gave on this 15th Aprill 1658 aged 2 years and 7 weeks.’

C

The other small stone beside this reads similarly:-

‘Here under resteth, waiting for the coming of his blessed Saviour, the body of EDWARD HUGESSEN, third son of JOHN HUGESSEN and CHRISTIAN his wife, who departed this life 28th January 1663 aged 11 months and 14 days.’

D

A larger stone next to this has the following dedication:-

‘Here lieth the body of MARY EVERINGE, late wie (wife) of ROBERT EVERINGE Esquire, oney of the daughters of JAMES HEUKINSON Esquire whoe left issueJAMES and JANE, died 16th day of April 1633

(probably another example of the inability of the stonemason to read the writing which he was copying)

E

The last of the smaller stones, which rests against the north wall, next to the altar cloth store, reads:-

‘Here (expecting the coming of his Saviour) resteth the body of WALTER HUGESSEN, the sixth sonne of JAMES HUGESSEN Esquire and JANE his wife, who died in the yeere 1625 being of age four yeeres and halfe.’

F

The largest of the stones, made of slate, is positioned towards the south side of the chapel and carries a large copy of a crest and coat of arms, and bears the following:-

‘The stone that covers this vault, was deposited by WILLIAM HUGESSEN Esquire of Provender in ye year 1730, in memory of SIR WILLIAM HUGESSEN Knight, 1675, JOHN HUGESSEN Esquire his son 1670 and CHRISTIAN, his wife 1712. WILLIAM HUGESSEN Esquire, the son of JOHN, 1719, and ELIZABETH his wife 1725, and their children LEA, ELIZABETH, ANNE and EDWARD.’

G

Further towards the east wall lies a stone with two brasses inset, The top is a square brass bearing the family crest, and the other below it carries the inscription:-

‘Here under lieth(expecting the coming of her Saviour) ELIZABETH, late wife of MR. WILLIAM HUGESEN (HUGESSEN) who was the daughter of SIR JOHN HIPPISLEY Knight, and leaving issue of two sons viz. JOHN and JAMES and three daughter viz. JANE, ANN and ELIZABETH. She departed this life the 11th of December in the year of our Lord 1642.’

This concludes the listing of memorials in the Hugessen Chapel. It is a pity that the organ has been positioned so close to the west end of the chapel, thereby obscuring one of the wall hung memorials. Although it would be possible to move the organ, it would involve considerable expense, and is a low priority at present.

Mary Weller was servant to the Hugessen family until her death. She was much loved by the family, but because protocol (presumably) prevented her burial in the chapel, her remains were buried as close to the chapel as possible. Hence, her gravestone can be seen outside, very close to the north wall of the chapel, and bears the following inscription:-

‘Here lies interrd y body of Mrs Mary Weller of this Parish. She departed this Life Janr the 27 1753 Aged 75 years. With ye Hugessons she lived And from them favours she rec’d. And now she is dead and here she lies, Hoping with them to Glory rise’.
The window to this chapel, like most of the glass, is quite recent and depicts St. Peter and St Paul either side of the Virgin and infant Jesus. Each of the disciples carries a book with inscription: St. Peter’s reads ‘St. Peter Apostle of Jesus Christ’ but that carried by St Paul is not altogether clear, but appears to read ‘ St Paul, servant of Jesus Christ’

3. Roper Chapel

Moving now to the South Chapel, which is known as the Roper Chapel. The Roper family played a significant part in local and national affairs. The family is an old one and has been connected with Kent as early as the 13th century. It is recorded that a “John Ropere” of Canterbury lent forty pounds to “furnish a fleet” against the French in 1377. John Roper of Swalecliffe and St. Dunstan’s Canterbury, who died in 1488, acquired Well Hall, Eltham by marriage. Their son John Roper was the husband of Jane Fineux, eldest daughter of Sir John Fineux, Lord Chief Justice of the courts of Henry VII and Henry VIII. This same John Roper was Attorney-General and Prothonotary of the King’s Bench in the reign of Henry VIII. John and Jane’s first son, William, married Margaret the daughter of Thomas More Lord Chancellor to Henry VIII. Tradition has it that after More’s execution in July 1535, Margaret carried his head to St. Dunstan’s Canterbury. She spent the night with her brother-in-law, Christopher, at his manor in Lynsted called Bedmangore. This house has long since vanished, but it stood somewhere in the neighbourhood of the present Lynsted Park. Christopher afterwards built a new house near to Bedmangore which he called Logge (Lodge). This was an E-shaped Elizabethan manor house which contained one hundred rooms. Much of it was demolished between 1820 and 1830, so much so that it is difficult to see or imagine how it looked in the seventeenth century. The reason for this destruction was a lawsuit.

Despite the fact that were of Catholic persuasion, John Roper donated fifty pounds to Queen Elizabeth towards the cost of fitting out a ship against invasion by King Philip of Spain’s Armada in 1588. It is said that this gesture gained John his knighthood at her hands. This Sir John was made Baron Teynham and Lord of the whole Manor in 1616 by James I “because he was the first man of note to proclaim the King in the County” (Hasted).

John RoperIt is possible to observe two of the most magnificent memorials in the whole of the County. The monument to the north of the altar, is dedicated to the memory of Christopher Roper, son of Sir John Roper whose monument stands opposite on the south side of the south chapel. Knowing that he was nearing the end of his life, Sir John Lord Teynham, ordered his monument and tomb in the church. It depicts him and his second wife Elizabeth recumbent, with the kneeling figures of his son, Christopher, and two daughters behind. This monument has been restored through the generosity of the Friends of Kent Churches, as has the one opposite.

 

 

1

This splendid monument of Sir John’s has the Latin inscription:-

John Roper InscriptionSPES ME IN DEO
HIC OBDORMIT IN DOMINO JOHANNES ROOPERUS AEQUES
AURATUS DOMINUS TEYNEHAM BARODE TEYNEHAM CV
ELIZABETH, UXORE SVA, FILIA RICHARDI PARKI ARMIGERI
EQUA PROGENIT CHRISTOPHERUM ROOPERI, AEQUITEM
AURATUM ELIZABETHA UXOREM GEORGII VAUX, MATRE
EDWRDI DOMINI VAUX BARONIS DE HARRODON, ET
IANAM UXOREM ROBERTI LOVELLI AEQUITIS AURATI
VIR AEQUIBONIOZ CULTOR PRINCIPIBUS TRIBUS NEMPE
MARIAE, ELIZABETHAE E JACOBO NUNC REGI ANGLIAE
SERVISSIMO, SUB QUIBUS VIXIT PATRIAQZ FIDELISSIMUS
HOSPITALIS, PAUPERIBUS BENIFICUS, VICIVIS BENIGNUS,
ET QUI MORTALITATIS MEMOR CERTA SPE RESURGENDI
IN CHRISTO HOC MONUMENTUS, SIBI VIVUS POSIT
VIXIT ANNOS 84: OBIT XX
DIE AUGUSTI ANNO DNI 1618

The inscription translates as follows:-

MY HOPE IS IN GOD
Here sleeps in the Lord, John Roper, Distinguished knight, Lord and Baron of Teynham, with Elizabeth his wife, who was the daughter of Sir Richard Park. She gave birth to Christopher Roper, distinguished knight, Elizabeth, who married George Vaux and mother of Lord Edward Vaux Baron of Harrodon, and Jan, wife of Sir Robert Lovell, distinguished knight. He (John) cultivated all that was fair and good. He was assuredly a very loyal servant to three monarchs, Mary, Elizabeth and James. He was very patriotic, generous and kind to the poor and to his neighbours. Mindful of his own mortality, and in sure and certain hope of the resurrection in Christ, set up this monument while he was still living. He lived for 84 years, and died 30th August 1618.

On the floor at the foot of this monument lies a memorial brass to Elizabeth Parke, wife of Sir John Roper. She was the only daughter of Richard Parke. The inscription beneath should be read with the information on the wall mounted Pedigree, which states that this same Elizabeth was only twelve years old when she married John Roper, being his second wife, and the brass indicates that she bore John Roper three children, Christopher, Elizabeth and Jane. Three children are depicted both on the brass and the monument.

Elisabeth Roper nee Parke‘HERE LYETH BURIED ELIZABETH ROOPER, LATE WIFE OF JOHN ROPPER, OF KENT, ESQUIER, AND SOLE HEYER OF RICHARD PARKE, OF KENT, ESQUIER, WHO HAD ISSUE BY THE SAID JOHN ROOPER ONE SONNE AND TWO DAUGHTERS, SHE LEDD HER LYFE MOST VIRTUOUSLY, AND ENDED THE SAME MOST CATHOLYKELY. WHOSE SOULS GOD PARDON’.

This is copied from the inventory written by Rev. Hopkins Fox, who, like myself, was quite capable of making mistakes and writing what was meant instead of copying what was written!

2

Christopher Roper MemorialChristopher Roper MemorialOpposite, in sharp contrast to the rather stiff formal figures, is the tomb of Christopher Roper, by ‘that most exquisite artist’ Epiphanius Evesham, a sculptor of renown. Christopher inherited the title of Lord Teynham, but only survived his father by a few years, his death being but four years later in 1622.

This monument depicts Christopher in his armour gazing towards the altar. His widow, dressed in contemporary French mourning dress kneels beside him gazing, too, at the altar. Beneath the main figures are two panels. On the right is shown the two sons kneeling in prayer, mourning the death of their father, having just returned from hunting with their hawks and dogs. The left hand panel shows a fine example of Evesham’s work and depicts five female figures. The two daughters, Margaret and Mary, together with two other ladies founded the Benedictine Abbey at Ghent. Mary, kneeling, became Abbess and was noted for her piety, excellent singing and humility. It was Mary, just a month before she died, who was visited by the young Charles II just after the beheading of his father. She received him privately and he expressed his gratitude for the comfort that her wisdom gave him as he mourned the death of his father. When she was taken ill, he sent his own private physician to attend her. She died at the age of 52 years.

At first appearances, the four standing figures are wearing necklaces and carry dogs (one unfortunately has lost its head), but on reflection, the necklaces could possibly be rosaries, and the dogs sacrificial lambs. The figure that has neither necklace or lamb is in fact a married daughter, the others are nuns. In the centre of the panel on the tomb is a smaller figure. This is Christopher’s granddaughter, Catherine, and is dressed as a novice. She was sent by her parents to live with her aunts. After a year at the convent ‘being about 14 years old she having the vocation to be a Poor Clare, would willingly have put it into execution, but Almighty God, seeing... that her delicate and tender constitution might be the obstacle... sent her a gentle fever.’ She died about three weeks before her Aunt Margaret who stands beside her.

(Little is known about Evesham except that he was born in Hertford in 1570, a twin and one of fourteen children. He studied under Richard Stephens, an Anglo-Dutchman, and is recognised as a key figure in religious monumental art.).

Beneath the central panel is the following Latin inscription:-

Christopher Roper InscriptionD.O.M.
DOMINO CHISTOPHERO ROOPER
BARONI
FILIO IONNIS DOMINI
TEYNHAM
VIRO
AB INFANTIA
VITAE INNOCENTIA INTEGERRIMO
IN FIDE AC RELIGIONE
CATHOLICA CONSTANTISSIMO
REGI ET PATRIAE
FIDELITATE NULLI SECUNDO
OBMORUM SVA VITATUM OMNI HOMINUM GENERIGRATISSIMO
IN IVRIARUM PATIENTISSIMO
PATRI PAUPERIUM
VITIORUM HOSTI
OPTIMO CONIVGI
QUI
MUNDI PERTAESUS
COELO MATURUS
PIISIMI OBIT
ANNO DOMINI MDC XXIJ
AETATIS SVA LX
DIE XVI APRIL
CATHERINA UXOR
POSVIT

Translated, this reads:-

TO GOD MOST GOOD MOST GREAT
Lord Christopher Roper,Baron, Son of John Lord Teynham, A man who was From his youth totally incorruptible (or full of integrity). Steadfast in the Catholic faith and second to none in his loyalty to King and Country. A man who was pleasing to all manner of men because of the generosity of his Character, and very tolerant of any wrong done to him. He was a benefactor to the poor, An enemy of sin, and an Excellent Husband. Having tired of this world, He went to heaven at an advanced age in a state of grace in the year of Our Lord 1622, Aged 60 years 16th April.

This monument was set up by his wife.

The view that an ‘advanced age’ was encountered when one reached 60, shows how life expectancy has changed since 1622!

There are several plaques mounted on the south wall. They are described, moving from the memorial of Sir John towards the west (right)

4

The first and uppermost of two, in white marble on black slate, bears the family arms and is dedicated to the memory of John Lord Teynham.

THIS TABLET WAS ERECTED
BY CAPT. C.H. TYLER
TO PERPETUATE THE MEMORY
OF HIS MUCH RESPECTED UNCLE
THE RIGHT HONBLE
JOHN LORD TEYNHAM
WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE
THE 6TH OF SEPTEMBER 1824
AGED 58 YEARS.

5

Cast in bronze with the head in profile is the largest of the tablets, and is dedicated to the memory of Carrie Lumley Holland. Her involvement in the community both locally and nationally is obvious by the presence of a number of insignia. At the foot of the tablet is the badge of the Girl Guides; on the left is the medallion showing a babe in arms; at the left corner is the Red Cross; opposite to which is the Fleur de Lys, part of the family crest, a design which is repeated in the tiles of the chapel floor and also in the base of the Victorian font at the south side of the tower wall, at the west end of the church; and beneath this is a medallion depicting the Prince of Wales’ feathers above a cross.

The dedication on the plaque reads:-

‘To the loved and revered memory of
CARRIE
Widow of Major General Lumley Holland,
Who passed into life eternal 1 February 1929
At Lynsted Park, The home of her Roper Forbears.
A Brave heart, A Noble Soul Endowed with wisdom and simple faith
Her wide sympathies loyalty and unselfishness
Inspired those who knew her,
In her public activities and home life
She was ever an influence for good,
In whose memory and that of her beloved husband
The high altar was given by their only child
Vivian Roper Lumley-Holland of Lynsted Park
And dedicated by
Cosmo Archbishop of Canterbury 13 October 1935’

Moving west, the topmost in a column of three tablets is dedicated to Charles William Roper Tyler as follows:-

In loving memory of Charles William
Roper Tyler

late of The Lodge,
Died 20th May 1927 in Nice
aged sixty one years,
and of His Wife
Dorothy Irene
late of villa Murazur
Died 7th December 1981
Aged 99 years and 10 months.

The last remark on the above inscription is a poignant indication of the two months which deprived Dorothy of centenarian status.

7

Below this tablet is a small brass plaque bearing the following inscription:-

Katie
Wife of Lieut. Col.
Charles J. Roper Tyler
Retired 80th Regt. Of LYNSTED LODGE
Died April 30, 1880 Aged 38.

8

Lowest of the three tablets is a very well decorated stone plaque with colourful mosaic border incorporating in the four corners the coats of arms of the two branches of the family: Tiger rampant with coronet above a crested helm. This plaque is dedicated to the husband of Katie, whose memorial plaque is above:-

In memory of CHARLES
JOHN ROPER TYLER

of Lodge in this Parish (some
time of the Buffs) Lt. Colonel
of the 80th Regiment. Born 6th June
1835, Died 4th Feby. 1914.

9

In matching style to that of the white marble mural of Capt C. H. Tyler (No. 4) is that dedicated to his mother:-

THIS TABLET WAS ERECTED
BY CAPT N. C.H. TYLER,
IN AFFECTIONATE REGARD
OF HIS DEAR MOTHER
THE HONBLE. BETTY MARIA TYLER,
WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE
THE IST OF MARCH 1788 AGED
26 YEARS

10

A large bronze plaque matching that to CARRIE , but dedicated as follows:-

LT. COLONEL HENRY WILLIAM ERNEST HITCHENS
WHO WAS KILLED COMMANDING HIS REGIMENT,
THE 1ST BATTALION THE MANCHESTER REGIMENT
AT THE SECOND BATTLE OF YPRES 1915.
THIS TABLET HAS BEEN ERECTED AT THE REQUEST
OF THE LATE
MARY VIVIAN ROPER-LUMLEY-HOLLAND
IN MEMORY OF HER MUCH LOVED COUSIN.

11

Beneath this is the Pedegree of the Roper-Tyler family.

12

The last of the memorials in this chapel is dedicated to Colonel C.H. Tyler who was responsible for donating the font which now stands in the north west corner of the church, adjacent to the wall of the tower. The brass plaque reads as folows:-

Charles Henry Tyler
of
Lynstead Lodge
Colonel East Kent Militia
Deputy Lieutenant for the County of Kent
Died 28th September 1872
Aged 84 years
Delilah
wife of the above
Died 5th December 1875
Aged 70 years.

The choir stalls ( and this is where there is divergence of opinion) extend into the chapel and cover some of the tiles. It is my belief that the extension was made by the Victorians, who wished to accommodate a very large choir whilst keep the chapel separate from the main body of the church. In the pew front which stands behind the door in the Roper chapel, it is possible to see the original woodwork within which there is an opening (the hinge to this door can be seen in the rail). The line of the door can traced( below the book rest) which swung outwards into the chancel giving access to the chapel. This was altered to the present narrow door by the sanctuary rail.

4) Chancel Tablets

Re-tracing steps to the chancel, the large tablets are described looking towards the West window. The first of these on the right just east of the chancel steps carries the following:-

IN MEMORIE
OF JOHN BROOKE GENT
LATE OF THIS PARISH
WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE AUGT. 2D 1660

To the left of this is a tablet the inscription is well worn, but still discernible and makes reference to a very interesting detail about the building regarding a gallery, which is no longer in existence, but which ran in front of the west window at the back of the church. The memorial also makes reference to the Rev. John Hinde A.M. of St. John College Cambridge, brother-in-law to Hopkins Fox;

D.O.M.
Here lyeth the Remains of The
Revd. HOPKINS FOX B.D. Rector of
RUCKINGE in this County, and Vicar
of this Parish. He departed this life on the
3rd Jan, 1793 In the 57 Year of his Age.
Here also lyeth the Remains of
ELIZABETH FOX, the Wife of the said
HOPKINS FOX, and Daughter of
WILLIAM HINDE of B...sou? in the County
of York Esq., she died the 7th of
July 1771, Aged 37.
Also the Remains of ELIZ. MARY FOX
the infant Daur. of the said HOPKINS FOX and
ELIZ. FOX who died on the 19th Sept 1768
Also the Remains of the Rev. JOHN HINDE
A.M. of St. John College (?) Cambridge.
and Bro. of the said ELIZ FOX.
he died on the 17th June 1781 Aged 41
Underneath the Gallery in this Church
lyes the Remains of HOPKINS FOX.
an Infant, the son of JOHN HOPKINS FOX
Eldest son of the said Revd. H. FOX
he died on the 21st Novr. 1789
Requieseant in Peace Amen
SACRED to the Memory of FRANCES FOX
Posthumous Daughter of the late Revd. HOPKINS
FOX and MARY his Wife who Died August 25th
1796, Aged 3 Years and 5 Days.

Moving east towards the altar, there is a large slate stone bearing the arms of the Eve family, and the motto: VITAE MEDIO MORIMUR, beneath which is the following dedication:-

Sacred to the Memory of DOROTHY Wife of
Charles Eve of the City of Canterbury Gent.
Second Son of James Eve M.A. Vicar of
Teynham and Rector of Midley in this County.
She was Daughr: and sole Heiress of Henry Eve
of this Place Gent: and Great Grand Daughr:
of Henry Eve D.D. formerly Vicar of this Church
and Rector of Midley
She died of an Apoplexy at her House in
Canterbury June 16th: 1755.
in the 32d: Year of her Age

And this verse:

Here lodge the Relicks of a virtuous Wife
Whose sickly Frame embitter’d all her Life.
To her, gay smiling Health deny’d her Aid
Awhile she visited, but seldom staid
Death, sudden Death at length afforded Ease
And cropt her in the Blossom of her Days
Alas! too instanly - too soon remov’d
From him she honour’d, and from him she lov’d
This Tomb(‘twas all he could ) the Husband gave
And paid this mournfull Tribute to her Grave.

Moving north towards the organ, there is another large stone bearing a square brass plate set diagonally which carries the coat of arms of John Worley and beneath are two full length figures, one depicting John, and the other that of his wife. From the lack of any dates pertaining to the death of his wife, it might be a matter of speculation that the remains of his wife were not interred here, or that the brass was fixed prior to the death of his wife, and thereafter, the engraving was not completed. Further research is required here.

The inscription reads :-

HERE LYETH THE BODY OF JOHN WORLEY OF SKUDDINGTON IN THE PARISHE OF THONG GENT’. DECEASED THE 17TH DAY OF SEPTEM: ANNO DNI: 1621 AND THE BODY OF ALICE HIS WIFE WHO DECEASED THE DAY OF ANNO DOMINI

After research which has revealed that a further tomb exists in the chancel, there is speculation that the choir stalls cover the brass plaque which commemorates the burial of John Ascough:-

“Here lyeth buryed John Ascough, esquire, sometime one of the justices of the Peace in the county of Kent, in the dayes of Queen Elizabeth of famous memory, who departed out of this transitory life the xvi day od January, in the yere of or Lo: Christ 1601 beinge of the age of 92, and procedig of right worshipfull stock of Ascough, in Lincolnshire."

[Society Note: Thanks to its discovery in a waste skip in the 1960's, Pam and Alec Lewis returned this brass plaque to the church after a Society Open History Day. This also corrects the family name, which should read "Aiscough". Its reinstallation now rests with Lynsted Church to negotiate with Canterbury! November 2013]

John Aiscough plaque discarded in the 1960s in a skip in Lynsted saved by Alec Lewis

Before leaving the Chancel, the wall hung memorials are worth observing. These, with one exception, refer to the Barlings (of Egerton)

To the south is a brass plaque, damaged by the shrapnel from the bomb, with Barling arms above and decorated border of leaves, dedicated as follows:-

In fond and ever loving memory of
Philip Barling Esq.,
Of Nouds in this Parish
Who died 13th Feb 1897 aged 67 years.
Also
Caroline (Kitty) Wife of the above
Who died 9th Dec 1881 aged 42 years.
They left issues five sons and three daughters.
This brass was erected in reverence to their memory
By their children.

Above is a white marble plaque on a black slab, with a vase over which is draped a cloth, with leaves decorating the bowl:-

In this Chancel
Are deposited the Remains
Of
JOHN SMITH BARLING Esqr.:
Impropriator of this Parish.
Who died the 16th of February
1795
Aged 63 Years.

John Smith Barling was probably the son of Thomas (mentioned below) by his second wife Elizabeth (Smith).

To the north wall opposite

Thomas BarlingSacred to the Memory of THOMAS BARLING Gent Descend’d from the Family of the BARLINGS (otherwise BARMELINGS of EGERTON in the Hundred of CALEHILL) To say anything of his Character Temper and Good Principles Is unnecessary as he lived Forty Years in this Parish. He Died Janry. The 3rd 1770 Aged 79 Years. His Remains are deposited in this Chancel near this Spot Together with those of his two Wives the first of whom was ELIZABETH EVE Daughter of HENRY EVE Esqr. Of this Parish By whom he left Surviving Issue PHILIP & CLARE; His Second Wife Was ELIZABETH SMITH Daughter of JOHN SMITH Gent. of This Parish, by whom He Left Surviving Issue JOHN & DOROTHY. This Monument was put up in Reverence to his Memory By his Son PHILIP.

Hanging immediately beneath this is an interesting pewter casting depicting the head of Christ with crown of thorns against St. Veronica’s handkerchief, and surrounded by the heads of the Twelve Apostles. This belonged to Rev. Erhmann, previous vicar of this parish, and Rev. Gordon Sherwood who grew up in the parish, remembers that it hung on the wall of the Rev. Erhmann’s study.

Next to the memorial of Thomas is that of John, presumably grandson of Thomas:-

(coat of arms which shows an arm having a clenched fist above a shield showing a large fish of gold, quartered with two lions red, rampant above a chevron and a third lion rampant)

Sacred
To The Memory of
JOHN BARLING Esqre
Of Nouds in This Parish
Who departed this life November 27th
1853
Aged 76 Years
Also ANN wife of the above
Who died October 25th 1853
Aged 61 years
Leaving a large family to lament
Their loss.
They were kind, indulgent Parents, and very
Charitable to the poor.

The east window is one replacing that destroyed in the WWII, and deserves close inspection. It depicts a number of saints around the central figure of Christ seated in glory, robed in scarlet and holding a sceptre. The marks on the nails in His hands and feet are clearly visible. Fragments of the original (pre war) glass have been worked into the margin of each window which are best inspected from the Sanctuary step.

At the very top of the window appear four mystical creatures, representing the gospel writers i.e. St. Mark., St Matthew, St. Luke and St. John all written vertically at the side of each of four windows.

The figures are, from left to right:

St. Aiden, with the cross of (St Andrew above), holding a bishop’s crosier in one hand and a torch in the other. St. Alban (martyr) clad in armour with crucifix palm branch and sword. Christ seated and robed. St. Dunstan holding forging pincers and cross: the Venerable Bede with book and water ewer. The second row: St. Ethelreda crowned, with book and staff, St. Augustin with cross and holding a chalice in which there is the figure of a king. Edward the Confessor holding a ring and sceptre, and finally St. Hugh of Lincoln, with a crosier in his left hand and in his right hand a chalice in which the artist has placed the infant Jesus holding an orb. There is a small darkened pane of glass to the lower right of the window inscribed with the name of the artist and glaziers together with the date of construction.

5) Nave Tablets

Leaving the Chancel and entering the nave, the memorials are hidden beneath the matting (which may be rolled back). The first of the memorials, and I think most appropriately placed at the foot of the chancel step is that of an infant, small and lozenge shaped, and is made of white marble. The stone bears the following inscription:-

Here lyeth
The body of
Elizabeth Skeere
Who dyed the 4 th of
August 1707 Aged
One year & 3
Days

Who she was, and the circumstances of her sad death , are unknown.

Moving west, between the pews, in the centre aisle, are a number of very large tablets in black slate; the leftmost of the first two, dedicated to Mary Barton, was badly damaged during the war, and reads as follows:-

Hic sepulta Jacet
Maria uxor Thomae Barton
gen Filia primogeneta Johis
Greenstreet De Claxfield in
fra hanc parochiam gen. Quae
Obiit vicesimo quinto die
February Ano Dni 1659

It is interesting to note that in the record made by Rev. Hopkins Fox of slabs and memorials, he does not record the inscriptions as they appear with apparent mistakes made by the stonemasons, but corrects these mistakes e.g. on the slab just described, he records ‘primogeneta’ as ‘primogenita’, and February as ‘Februarii’ . The translation is as follows:-

‘Here lies buried Mary, the wife of Thomas Barton gentleman, the firstborn daughter of John Greenstreet of Claxfield in this parish, gentleman. She died on 20th February in the year of our Lord 1659’

On the right of this slab is one in a much better state of preservation :

Here Lieth the Body o
JOHN GEORGE GENT: who
Departed this Life the 19 TH
of April 1725 Aged 49
Here also Lyeth
ye body of EDWD. GEORGE
who Departed this Life
the 12th, day of Octobr. 1727
in the 49 TH yeare of His Age

Moving towards the west, and immediately next to these two is a single large slab dedicated to Henry Godwin:-

HERE LYETH INTER’D YE BODY OF
HENRY GODWIN GENT: WHO
DEPARTED THIS LIFE ON THE 28TH
OF SEPTEMBER 1691 AGED 47 YERS
If Goodnes can preserve over Memory
Free from ye Rust of time or envys tongue
No Sacriligious hand Shall dare to wrong
This Peacefull urn where they Blest ashes Lye
Liberal just & Good when named these three
whee Copy thee

Here Also Layette (sic) the Body of Mrs
MARY PRATT Widow Mother to ye
Wife of ye Sayd HENRY GODWIN who
Departed this Life ye 18th of August
1686 Aged 63 years.

The next slab is described by Hopkins Fox as being in the ‘cross ai(s)le’ and is dedicated to a previous vicar. The slate slab bears a reasonably well defined and elaborate coat of arms depicting sheaves of corn, sheep, heads of some other animal, and anchors between chevrons, all on a shield beneath a crested helm and surrounded by leaves. This slab has also suffered war damage:

Here Lieth the Body of the
Revd. JOHN IRONS. B:D.
late Vicar of this Parish, who
in the 80th Year of his Age.
Watch and Pray.

For such a slab, the inscription seems very terse.

The last of the slabs in the central aisle (now in the Community Room) is that of Arthur Knowlden, and it is from the description given by Hopkins Fox that the position of the gallery was confirmed.

‘Under the gallery:

“Here lyeth the bodi of Arthur Knowlden,
of Lynksted, who died the 7th day of September,
1651, being of the age of 27”

6) South Aisle

Moving to the south aisle, there are three large slabs, one black and unwritten to the west of the cross-aisle, and the others to the east. The first of these, nearest the south porch, commemorates one Duke Boorne:-

The tablet is headed with a coat of arms

Here lies Buried ye Body of DUKE BOORNE,
only SUNN of WILLIAM BOORNE OF
LINKSTED GENT, WHO MARRIED REBECAKA(sic)
SECOND DAUGHTER OF Mr. JOHN GREENSTREET
THE SAME PARRISH. LEFT ISHW
ONE DAUGHTER
ANN. HE DEPARTED THIS LIFE AUGUST Ye 17’
Ano DNI 1666
AETATIS 24 ANN 4 MONETHS.

The last of the tablets is almost completely obliterated, but because of the record of Hopkins Fox, we now know that this is the tomb of Frances Tong. Hopkins Fox’s record reads as follows:-

‘HEERE LYETH THE BODIE OF
FRANCES TONG WIDDOW, LATE WIFE
OF JAMES TONG, LATE OF BORDEN, GENT
AGED THREE SCORE AND SIX YEARS AND
ELEVEN MONTHS, WHO HAD ISSUE BY
HIM ONE SUNN AND ONE DAUGHTER.
SHE DIED AT CLAXFIELD IN THIS PARISH
THE 18TH DAY OF MARCH 1663 AND OF
REBECKA HER SAID DAUGHTER LATE
WIFE OF JOHN GREENSTREET, OF CLAXFIELD,
GENT. AGED 40 AND 3 YEARES AND FOUR
MONTHS, WHO HAD ISSUE BY HIM 4 SONNES
AND SIX DAUGHTERS; SHE DIED AT CLAXFIELD
THE 16TH DAY OF MARCH 1663; WHOSE DEATH
HAPPENING SOE NEARE TOGETHER THEY WERE
BURIED AT ONE TYME IN THIS GRAVE

The above inscription covers sixteen lines on the slab, and from the letters that are legible, it is probable that they were arranged above, but I cannot confirm this as Fox’s record carries no indication of the arrangement.

The last slab lies at the foot of the step up into the Roper Chapel and is a small white marble lozenge with the name Jane Tucker. This may be a dedication to the wife or daughter of 'Stephen Tucker, A.M. 1793, the present vicar - Before vicar of Limne' as recorded in Hasted's list of vicars on this website.

Who she was and what is beneath this tablet remains a mystery at present.

Looking up and to the left on the pillar facing west is the memorial to Samuel Fairman:-

Sacred
To the memory of
Saml. Creed Fairman, Esqre.
Who departed this life
The 24th April 1859.
Aged 66 years.
Leaving an affectionate wife
And daughter
To lament his irreparable loss.
His remains are interred in the
family vault in Teynham Church.

Coat of Arms (‘bedspread’)

Why this memorial is displayed here and not in Teynham is a matter of conjecture and requires further research.

The last entry of Hopkins Fox was under the heading of ‘ PAINTED GLASS’ for which he records the single word ‘NONE’

This probably indicates that the Puritans took out what glass if any was left by the post Reformation vandals, and the most recent pre-war glass must have been mainly Victorian and post Hopkins Fox, who died in 1793.

Much information has been gathered from Elizabeth Selby’s ‘Teynham Manor and Hundred, and Rev. W. Hill’s ‘History of Three Villages’

My thanks to all those who have helped in the compilation of this document:

Ann Diamond who obtained information from the Kent Family History Society
To Geoff Horsfield for the Latin translation
To my wife for her patience when I was occupied at the keyboard instead of being occupied elsewhere around the house,
And to my sons whose computers I have used prior to obtaining one of my very own

©David James Wood (Churchwarden 1996-)


Additional Research (2006) on North Chapel Families

(Additional Notes by David Wood, Churchwarden)

The North Chapel was probably connected with Sewards Manor and the Finch family. It contains a tablet to the last of the Finches (Catherine), who married Sir Dru Drury, and tablets to James Hugessen, who bought the Finch-Drury estates, and many of his descendants.

Kentish Names & Arms (Cecil Humphery-Smith)

More than one hundred Hugessens are recorded and the coat of arms, obviously canting on the Hogs, appears liberally wrought on monuments, hatchments and in brass and glass, from the early seventeenth century to our own times. It is believed that the Hugessens name was to be found in ‘Linstead’ at least three centuries earlier, but there have been foreign connections in the family which have led to some to speculate a Dutch or German origin for the Kentish family. Elvin’s Records of Walmer, p. 70 – a rarish work now - gives the Hugessen pedigree in some detail.

The principal male line came to an end with William Weston Hugessen of Provender, one of whose co-heiresses was his daughter, Mary, mother of Sir Edward Knatchbull, ninth baronet, who died aged 67 on the 24th May, 1849. He married firstly, Annabella Christina, daughter of Sir John Honeywood, Bart., of Evington, and by her had five sons and one daughter. She died suddenly at Provender in her 29th year, on Monday 4th April, 1814. Sir Edward then married Fanny Catherine, daughter of Edward Knight (brother of Jane Austen), of Godmersham Park, and by her had a further family of five sons and four daughters. The children of the second marriage took the surname Hugessen in addition to that of Knatchbull at their father’s request in memory of his mother, Mary. One of these sons, Edward, entered Parliament as his father had and, after a successful career in foreign and colonial politics as a Liberal, became Lord of the Treasury and subsequently Under-Secretary for Home Affairs and a privy Councillor. Edward was raised to the peerage as first Baron Brabourne in 1880, whereupon he changed his vote to Conservative.

Lord Brabourne made quite a reputation for himself publishing stories for children and perhaps this gift was stimulated by his Hugessen ancestry. They were certainly adventurers. Indeed James Hugessen, who died in 1646, was a member of the Merchant Adventurers Company and traded between Dover, Sandwich, London and France, the Netherlands and the New World. During the Spanish wars Hugh Hugessen fought as a freebooter captain in Holland and was granted, as “Huge Hugessine” by the Duke of Verdomme the splendid armorial bearings: Argent, on a mount vert in base an oak tree proper between two boars combatant sable armed and tusked or. The English Kings of Arms, of course, were only prepared to recognise a foreign grant to a subject of our Sovereign with a new grant and in 1624 Sir William Segar confirmed the arms to the descendants of Hugh, the Hugessen family of Norton and to James Hugessen of Linstead and Dover he granted Or, on a mount an oak tree proper between two boars combatant azure.

Yet, when the Dutch fleet sailed up the Medway in 1667 it was Major Hugessen – probably Sir William Hugessen of Provender in Norton, formerly of Sewards in Linstead, a lineal ancestor of Lord Brabourne – with a company of the trained bands who helped in the successful defence of the fort at Sheerness. Even in the seventeenth century the Hugessens lived to great age. James of Dover was more than 80 when he died in 1637 and the Major is said to have been an old man when he repulsed the Dutch. None was named as a royalist, which may account for survival through the troubled times!

James Hugessen was a generous man in his failing years. When the Church of St. Martin-le-Grand was closed soon after the Reformation the large churchyard, part of which had for long been used as an open market place, was taken over by the Corporation of Dover. Some eighty years later the King’s representative obtained possession which the Corporation contested. They were unable to establish a clear title, but hesitated to surrender to the Crown because, in the meantime, their Almshouse had been built on one corner, their Court House in the centre and their Market Hall on the north side of the Market Place. While the dispute went on, James purchased the Crown’s interests and by a splendid piece of legal conjuring obtained total freehold of the land and all that was built upon it including the Corporation’s buildings. Then by a deed of gift, he restored to the Mayor, Jurats and Commonality of the Cinque Port and Town of Dover the Almshouse, Court House and Market Hall. The several legal instruments remain to this day in the muniment cabinet. It is sad to reflect that two pre-Reformation churches – St Martin’s and St. Peter’s – perished in the interests of these commercial transactions.

James’s son, another James, became High Sheriff of the County of Kent. He died in 1646 and his monument in Linstead church shows the winged oak–tree crest above the arms.

HUGESSEN, Hugesson or Hugeson, is a simple patronymic type of surname signifying ‘son of Hugin, Hugen or Hugun,’ all these being diminutives of the personal name Hugh – derived through Old French from Old German Hugo, a short form of members of a whole group names having the Old German hugu meaning ‘heart, mind’ as their first element. It is likely, therefore, that while in Kent one particular family of the name has become famous and has many collateral branches surviving within the county, there are many unrelated descendants of unrelated Franks, Norse and Saxons named Hugh.